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Aaron Einhouse w special guest Gun Hill Royals

Aaron Einhouse.jpg

When Aaron Einhouse makes music, he creates with a deep reverence for the world’s greatest storytellers and admiration for the great men who came before him. Einhouse explores life, love and heartache with his fourth studio album It Ain’t Pretty, which is his most imaginative and literary music to date. 

But Einhouse comes by his creative process honestly. The family man and father of three is always studying. When he is not with family, onstage or in the studio, he can be found touring the country in a passenger van (named Vaän), listening to audio books and writing songs. The long hours on overnight road trips to the next town on tour serve as Einhouse’s office time. He is also an avid reader who packs Charles Bukowski on hunting trips.

“I like using foreshadowing and twists,” Einhouse says. “When you’re singing a song, you can make people feel things through music that you can’t do when you’re just telling the story.”

Tracked at The Panhandle House in Denton, Texas with Erik Herbst, the 10-song collection opens with the roadhouse scorcher “Dancin’” about balancing family life with a life on the edge. Einhouse co-wrote the country rocker “That’s What You Get” with Johnny Chops Richardson (Randy Rogers Band) about living with bad decisions. “If we all just did what our mama said and learn from our mistakes,” Einhouse says, “we’d all have better lives. But maybe they wouldn’t be quite as interesting. People never learn.”

Einhouse sings about embracing life’s harsher truths in the slide guitar-led title track, which he co-wrote with Hal Ketchum. Einhouse sings, “I’m here to tell you it’s all wrong / I’ve been lied to by fairy tales and songs.” “A huge recurring theme in the record is the duality of life,” Einhouse says. “Love can be wonderful and terrible at the same time. But you’ve got to go through hard times to appreciate the good times. On my previous albums, I don’t think I necessarily really embraced that side of writing. I am at that stage where I want to write whatever feels real.”